Find a station

Result

Select from the dropdowns below to find all stations and their frequencies in your area.

Help with Japanese Cars

If you drive an imported Japanese car with a Japanese radio installed, you will be receiving New Zealand FM frequencies via a gadget called a "Band Expander". This is because Japan uses a different FM frequency band from New Zealand and most other countries. At best it's a 'patch-up' solution, and you will occasionally receive interference depending on local frequencies and the size of your band expander. A radio designed for NZ is a much better option. However, if you're going to stick with your Japanese radio, and haven't already worked out how to tune by trial and error, here are our suggestions as to what to do...

  1. If Frequency Finder lists your favourite station at for example, NZ 100FM, try your Japanese radio at 90 FM. If your station is there, you can see the difference is 10MHz so you have a 10MHz expander. You can find your other stations by subtracting 10 from the Frequency Finder frequencies e.g. if Frequency Finder shows your next favourite at 90FM, you'll find it at 80FM on your Japanese radio.
  2. If 100FM doesn't show up at 90FM, next try 88 FM. If you strike gold this time it means you've got a 12MHz band expander. So subtract 12 from your other chosen stations e.g. 88 FM on F.F becomes 76FM on your Japanese radio.
  3. Subtract 14 from the F.F frequency - so e.g. 100FM becomes 86FM on your Japanese radio - this means that you have a 14MHz band expander. So, subtract 14 from the F.F frequencies you want and that will give you the frequencies on your Japanese radio.

Happy listening.

Result

Select from the dropdown below to find all frequencies nation wide for your favourite radio station.

Help with Japanese Cars

If you drive an imported Japanese car with a Japanese radio installed, you will be receiving New Zealand FM frequencies via a gadget called a "Band Expander". This is because Japan uses a different FM frequency band from New Zealand and most other countries. At best it's a 'patch-up' solution, and you will occasionally receive interference depending on local frequencies and the size of your band expander. A radio designed for NZ is a much better option. However, if you're going to stick with your Japanese radio, and haven't already worked out how to tune by trial and error, here are our suggestions as to what to do...

  1. If Frequency Finder lists your favourite station at for example, NZ 100FM, try your Japanese radio at 90 FM. If your station is there, you can see the difference is 10MHz so you have a 10MHz expander. You can find your other stations by subtracting 10 from the Frequency Finder frequencies e.g. if Frequency Finder shows your next favourite at 90FM, you'll find it at 80FM on your Japanese radio.
  2. If 100FM doesn't show up at 90FM, next try 88 FM. If you strike gold this time it means you've got a 12MHz band expander. So subtract 12 from your other chosen stations e.g. 88 FM on F.F becomes 76FM on your Japanese radio.
  3. Subtract 14 from the F.F frequency - so e.g. 100FM becomes 86FM on your Japanese radio - this means that you have a 14MHz band expander. So, subtract 14 from the F.F frequencies you want and that will give you the frequencies on your Japanese radio.

Happy listening.

Result

Select from the dropdowns below to find the radio station name of the frequency you are listening to in the area.

Help with Japanese Cars

If you drive an imported Japanese car with a Japanese radio installed, you will be receiving New Zealand FM frequencies via a gadget called a "Band Expander". This is because Japan uses a different FM frequency band from New Zealand and most other countries. At best it's a 'patch-up' solution, and you will occasionally receive interference depending on local frequencies and the size of your band expander. A radio designed for NZ is a much better option. However, if you're going to stick with your Japanese radio, and haven't already worked out how to tune by trial and error, here are our suggestions as to what to do...

  1. If Frequency Finder lists your favourite station at for example, NZ 100FM, try your Japanese radio at 90 FM. If your station is there, you can see the difference is 10MHz so you have a 10MHz expander. You can find your other stations by subtracting 10 from the Frequency Finder frequencies e.g. if Frequency Finder shows your next favourite at 90FM, you'll find it at 80FM on your Japanese radio.
  2. If 100FM doesn't show up at 90FM, next try 88 FM. If you strike gold this time it means you've got a 12MHz band expander. So subtract 12 from your other chosen stations e.g. 88 FM on F.F becomes 76FM on your Japanese radio.
  3. Subtract 14 from the F.F frequency - so e.g. 100FM becomes 86FM on your Japanese radio - this means that you have a 14MHz band expander. So, subtract 14 from the F.F frequencies you want and that will give you the frequencies on your Japanese radio.

Happy listening.

Result

Select from the dropdowns below to find the frequency of your favourite radio station in your area.

Help with Japanese Cars

If you drive an imported Japanese car with a Japanese radio installed, you will be receiving New Zealand FM frequencies via a gadget called a "Band Expander". This is because Japan uses a different FM frequency band from New Zealand and most other countries. At best it's a 'patch-up' solution, and you will occasionally receive interference depending on local frequencies and the size of your band expander. A radio designed for NZ is a much better option. However, if you're going to stick with your Japanese radio, and haven't already worked out how to tune by trial and error, here are our suggestions as to what to do...

  1. If Frequency Finder lists your favourite station at for example, NZ 100FM, try your Japanese radio at 90 FM. If your station is there, you can see the difference is 10MHz so you have a 10MHz expander. You can find your other stations by subtracting 10 from the Frequency Finder frequencies e.g. if Frequency Finder shows your next favourite at 90FM, you'll find it at 80FM on your Japanese radio.
  2. If 100FM doesn't show up at 90FM, next try 88 FM. If you strike gold this time it means you've got a 12MHz band expander. So subtract 12 from your other chosen stations e.g. 88 FM on F.F becomes 76FM on your Japanese radio.
  3. Subtract 14 from the F.F frequency - so e.g. 100FM becomes 86FM on your Japanese radio - this means that you have a 14MHz band expander. So, subtract 14 from the F.F frequencies you want and that will give you the frequencies on your Japanese radio.

Happy listening.